In order to give yourself the best advantage while out on the Lacrosse pitch, it is critical that you keep your gear fresh, and up to date. This includes changing out the mesh in your Lacrosse stick, to create either a high pocket or low pocket, depending on your preference!

In this blog post we will cover how to restring the low pocket of your lacrosse head. At Alpha Lacrosse, we think this can be a do-it-yourself job, and we’re here to show you the ten-step method for creating a lower pocket!

There are multiple ways to string a lacrosse head, and a low pocket may not be preferential for you. Some people like to create a high pocket, and so we recommend reviewing both videos, as well as our general tips for restringing  because you may find a different pocket works better for your game.

You should also understand that there are subtle differences between the way you achieve high pockets vs. low pockets, based on how you restring the mesh.

Make sure you know going into it, which pocket you’re trying to achieve, as that will dictate which tutorial you should watch. If you have any questions about which pocket is right for you, talk to your coach, or get in touch with us at Alpha Lacrosse and we’d be happy to help you.

Before we get going, let’s review a few of the key terms to remember as you read through this post.

Words To Live By:

Head – The plastic frame with holes where strings will lace to.

Mesh – The material that when properly laced up, will create a “pocket” and hold the ball.

Pocket – the part of the mesh that sags and will allow you to hold the ball without it slipping out.

Sidewall – The sides of the head where the lace holes are, where you will be lacing your side strings, shooting strings, and shooting nylon through.

Ten Diamond Loop – The technical term of the loops in the mesh that you will loop the string through as you restring your lacrosse head.

How to Create a Low Pocket

Step 1:

Take your string, knotted on one end, and put it through the top hole on the outside of the sidewall, and come up through the first ten diamond row of the mesh. Then, you will thread the string back through the first sidewall hole again, and back through the same ten diamond row, and through the loop you have now created. Cinch the knot so you tie the mesh against the sidewall.

Take your string, knotted on one end, and put it through the top hole on the outside of the sidewall, and come up through the first ten diamond row of the mesh. Then, you will thread the string back through the first sidewall hole again, and back through the same ten diamond row, and through the loop you have now created. Cinch the knot so you tie the mesh against the sidewall.

Step 2:

IMPORTANT – You are going to skip one sidewall hole. Do not thread the string through the sidewall hole directly adjacent to the first sidewall hole you threaded.

Instead you’re going to skip one lace hole, and thread your string through the outside of the next one. Remember to always go in through the outside of the lace hole during this part of the process. Once through, thread the string through the next ten-diamond hole, and cinch it through the loop you have created, thus tying it to the head, as you did in step one.

Step 3:

Repeat the process of skipping a lace hole three more times, looping in through the outside of the sidewall each time, through the next ten diamond hole in the mesh, and back through the loop you have created.

TIP: Make sure to really cinch the string each time, so the mesh is nice and tight against the side wall.

By the end of step 3, you should have five knots of alternating side wall holes, that don’t skip any ten diamond loops in the mesh, and that are all tightly cinched against the sidewall. You’ll know you did it right, if the middle of your mesh has a channel, which will give the ball more hold. Conversely, the top of your mesh should be much tighter.

Step 4:

By now, you should be at the skinnier part of your head, getting near the bottom of the sidewall. Pay attention, because it gets a little trickier as the width of the head decreases.

You will now go through two ten diamond holes, before creating your next knot against the sidewall, but continue to alternate lace holes.

*You can see in the pink circle in the picture to the left where the bunching of the mesh occurs as you go through two ten-diamond holes before creating your next knot.

Step 5:

By now, you should have seven total knots. After your seventh knot, you will stop alternating sidewall holes, and begin creating one knot, per sidewall hole, per ten diamond loop. You will do this two more times so that you have three knots in a row by the end of step five.

 Step 6:

By now, you should have nine total knots. At this point, you will skip a side wall hole, come in through the next lace hole, thread it through the ten-diamond loop, and make your usual knot.

Step 7:

To finish the sidewall portion, you will thread your string through the outside of the side wall, loop it through the first ten-diamond loop of the bottom row, out the side wall, and through the bottom hole.

This will be the only time your string comes from inside out of the side wall. By doing this you are creating a knot that prevents your mesh from unraveling.

Pull the string tight, and create a knot, so that the string cannot backtrack through the side wall.

Step 8:

At this point, you have properly strung the side wall portion of the head, and it is now time to finish your low pocket at the bottom of the head.

Ideally, you want the mesh to bag up and create a little bit of a pocket at the bottom (aka “low pocket”), so you’re able to hold the ball when you’re carrying it one-handed. To achieve this, you first come in through the top of the second bottom string hole, and back down through the first. You will know you did it correctly, if there is a knot preventing the string from pulling through the second bottom string hole, and the remainder of your string is available to you on the outside of the head, through the first bottom string hole.

Then, you will go through the bottom of the last ten diamond loop you used on the side wall (see photo below), continuing the trend of not skipping any ten diamond loops. Please refer to the photos to make sure you have the right ten-diamond loop in the mesh.

Step 9:

You will then take the string, and weave it through the next ten diamond hole, which is adjacent to the first ten diamond hole you started with for the bottom string. You will then weave the string all the way across the bottom of the mesh. Do not skip any ten diamond loops as you weave it across.

Step 10:

Once you have completed weaving through the bottom row of the ten diamond loops, you will come in through the bottom of the fourth bottom string hole, and back through the top of the third, so the remainder of the string is on the outside of the head.

Tie a knot to finish it off, double check that you have a nice pocket at the bottom of the mesh, and ensure all your knots are secure.

Conclusion

Congrats! You’ve now successfully strung a low pocket in your Lacrosse head! Remember these key tips as you go about reviewing your work.

  1. All your knots are well cinched tightly against the side of the head.
  2. You properly alternated the lace holes when necessary, and looped through consecutive lace holes when necessary.
  3. You did not skip any ten diamond loops either along the side, or bottom of the mesh.
    1. Make sure you have not doubled up a knot on any ten diamond loops, either.
  4. All securing knots at the beginning and end of the strings have been properly fastened, and won’t untie once you start playing.

It may take a couple tries for you to get comfortable with creating a low pocket, but after a few times, it will be like second nature to you!

Thank you for watching, and taking the time to learn how to properly create a low pocket in your lacrosse head!

Feel free to reach out to us with any additional questions you may have at info@alphalacrosseinc.com, and make sure you record and tag us @alphalacrosse as you go about restringing your own head! Good luck!